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Verona, Italy -“thrice blessed”

Yay…. bought some new journals while in Italy… in Verona… the hometown of Shakepeare’s Juliet!

New Journals

New Journals

Lord Byron wrote that Verona was “thrice-blessed” during his travels between it and Venice due to the stunning views along the river Adige which meanders around the borders of the old city centre.

We, however, arrived by train. It was weird, because usually train stations are in the centre of a town, but this station was de-centralised, so arriving in a northern Italian town in winter at 7pm not knowing in which direction to walk to get to the town centre was a bit unsettling. Luckily as we were arriving in the train we saw a huge christmas tree covered in lights, so figured if we walked toward that we’d be going in the right direction – and we were.

Apart from the location of the station, Verona was also very different from any of the towns we had already visited in Italy. Walking from the station to our accommodation was like walking through the wide double sided streets of Melbourne. The streets overall were extremely wide, reminding us of home – even in the historic town centre. I don’t know why this is and am curious to look up some Venetian history about why the town planning seems to be so different to the other towns we have visited in Italy.

Initial impressions revealed a city that had gutted the lower stories of the buildings to be replaced by modern shopfronts – big windows, big merchandise – another feature not as noticeable in other towns. There were also lots of street artists – a characteristic consistent with other towns – but of a different type: more creative and less reliant on ‘tourist’ traffic. And a noticeable absence of beggars and African rose sellers- a confronting and disturbing aspect of the country… but lets not get into politics!

Of course there was lots of history in architecture, statues, churches, and Shakespeare … and we went to a couple of gorgeous restaurants and funky bars. Overall Verona seemed to be a little more cosmopolitan than some other towns we visited in Italy (apart from Venice) and my theory for this is that they are much closer to the European mainland which historically has allowed for a greater cross fertilization, so that culturally this area is more open to new ideas and influences… as opposed to a town in the far south of the ‘boot’ which has been, and continues to be, much more insulated.

We only spent one night and two days in Verona, which was not enough to really explore the town and get a definitive ‘feel’ for the place. So I guess that means we’ll just have to go back!!

Noserings

Noserings

PS… I also bought some new noserings at the same gorgeous handmade market I bought the journals…

Scaliger Bridge The Castelvecchio Bridge (Italian: Ponte di Castelvecchio) or Scaliger Bridge (Italian: Ponte Scaligero) is a fortified bridge in Verona, northern Italy, over the Adige River. The segmental arch bridge featured the world's largest span at the time of its construction (48.70 m). It was built (most likely in 1354-1356) by Cangrande II della Scala, to grant him a safe way of escape from the annexed eponymous castle in the event of a rebellion of the population against his tyrannic rule. The solidity of the construction allowed it to resist untouched until, in the late 18th century, the French troops destroyed the tower on the left bank (although it probably dated from the occupation of Verona by the Visconti or the Republic of Venice). The bridge was however totally destroyed, along with the Ponte Pietra, by the retreating German troops on April 24, 1945. A faithful reconstruction begun in 1949 and was finished in 1951, with the exception of the left tower. source: wikipedia

Scaliger Bridge
The Castelvecchio Bridge (Italian: Ponte di Castelvecchio) or Scaliger Bridge (Italian: Ponte Scaligero) is a fortified bridge in Verona, northern Italy, over the Adige River. The segmental arch bridge featured the world’s largest span at the time of its construction (48.70 m).
It was built (most likely in 1354-1356) by Cangrande II della Scala, to grant him a safe way of escape from the annexed eponymous castle in the event of a rebellion of the population against his tyrannic rule. The solidity of the construction allowed it to resist untouched until, in the late 18th century, the French troops destroyed the tower on the left bank (although it probably dated from the occupation of Verona by the Visconti or the Republic of Venice).
The bridge was however totally destroyed, along with the Ponte Pietra, by the retreating German troops on April 24, 1945. A faithful reconstruction begun in 1949 and was finished in 1951, with the exception of the left tower.
source: wikipedia

Ancient Sarcophagus

Ancient Sarcophagus

Roman Theatre The theatre was built in the late 1st century BC. Before its construction, two walls were built alongside the Adige River, between the Ponte di Pietra and the Ponte Postumio, to protect it against floods. Today only remains of the edifice are visible, recovered starting from around 1830. They include the cavea and the steps, several arcades of the loggias and remains of the stage. source: wikipedia

Roman Theatre
The theatre was built in the late 1st century BC. Before its construction, two walls were built alongside the Adige River, between the Ponte di Pietra and the Ponte Postumio, to protect it against floods.
Today only remains of the edifice are visible, recovered starting from around 1830. They include the cavea and the steps, several arcades of the loggias and remains of the stage.
source: wikipedia

Restaurant overlooking the Piazza Bra Piazza Bra, often shortened to Bra, is the largest piazza in Verona, Italy, with some claims that it is the largest in the country.[1] The piazza is lined with numerous cafés and restaurants, along with several notable buildings.[1] The Verona Arena, originally an amphitheatre built nearly 2000 years ago, is now a world-famous music venue with regular operatic and contemporary music performances. Verona's town hall, the Palazzo Barbieri, also looks out across the piazza. source: wikipedia

Restaurant overlooking the Piazza Bra
Piazza Bra, often shortened to Bra, is the largest piazza in Verona, Italy, with some claims that it is the largest in the country.[1] The piazza is lined with numerous cafés and restaurants, along with several notable buildings.[1] The Verona Arena, originally an amphitheatre built nearly 2000 years ago, is now a world-famous music venue with regular operatic and contemporary music performances. Verona’s town hall, the Palazzo Barbieri, also looks out across the piazza.
source: wikipedia

ponte pietra bridge The Ponte Pietra (Italian for "Stone Bridge"), once known as the Pons Marmoreus, is a Roman arch bridge crossing the Adige River in Verona, Italy. The bridge was completed in 100 BC, and the Via Postumia from Genua to the Brenner Pass passed over it. It originally flanked another Roman bridge, the Pons Postumius; both structures provided the city (on the right bank) with access to the Roman theatre on the east bank. The arch nearest to the right bank of the Adige was rebuilt in 1298 by Alberto I della Scala. Four arches of the bridge were blown up by retreating German troops in World War II, but rebuilt in 1957 with original materials. source: wikipedia

ponte pietra bridge
The Ponte Pietra (Italian for “Stone Bridge”), once known as the Pons Marmoreus, is a Roman arch bridge crossing the Adige River in Verona, Italy. The bridge was completed in 100 BC, and the Via Postumia from Genua to the Brenner Pass passed over it.
It originally flanked another Roman bridge, the Pons Postumius; both structures provided the city (on the right bank) with access to the Roman theatre on the east bank. The arch nearest to the right bank of the Adige was rebuilt in 1298 by Alberto I della Scala. Four arches of the bridge were blown up by retreating German troops in World War II, but rebuilt in 1957 with original materials.
source: wikipedia

Middle Ages Church Mural

Middle Ages Church Mural

Manacles and Public Punishment Display Area in Piazza Bra Piazza Bra, often shortened to Bra, is the largest piazza in Verona, Italy, with some claims that it is the largest in the country.[1] The piazza is lined with numerous cafés and restaurants, along with several notable buildings.[1] The Verona Arena, originally an amphitheatre built nearly 2000 years ago, is now a world-famous music venue with regular operatic and contemporary music performances. Verona's town hall, the Palazzo Barbieri, also looks out across the piazza. source: wikipedia

Manacles and Public Punishment Display Area in Piazza Bra
Piazza Bra, often shortened to Bra, is the largest piazza in Verona, Italy, with some claims that it is the largest in the country.[1] The piazza is lined with numerous cafés and restaurants, along with several notable buildings.[1] The Verona Arena, originally an amphitheatre built nearly 2000 years ago, is now a world-famous music venue with regular operatic and contemporary music performances. Verona’s town hall, the Palazzo Barbieri, also looks out across the piazza.
source: wikipedia

Ancient Roman Gate Porta Borsari in Verona, Italy Porta Borsari is an ancient Roman gate in Verona, northern Italy. It dates to the 1st century AD, though it was most likely built over a pre-existing gate from the 1st century BC. An inscription dating from emperor Gallienus' reign reports another reconstruction in 265 AD. The Via Postumia (which here became the decumanus maximus) passed through the gate, which was the city's main entrance and was therefore richly decorated. It also originally had an inner court, now disappeared. The gate's Roman name was Porta Iovia, as it was located near a small temple dedicated to Jupiter lustralis. In the Middle Ages it was called Porta di San Zeno, while the current name derives from the guard soldiers which were paid the dazio (Latin bursarii). The façade, in local white limestone, has two arches flanked by semi-columns with Corinthian capitals which supports entablature and pediment. In the upper part is a two-floor wall with twelve arched windows, some of which are included in small niches with triangular pediment. source - wikipedia

Ancient Roman Gate Porta Borsari in Verona, Italy
Porta Borsari is an ancient Roman gate in Verona, northern Italy.
It dates to the 1st century AD, though it was most likely built over a pre-existing gate from the 1st century BC. An inscription dating from emperor Gallienus’ reign reports another reconstruction in 265 AD. The Via Postumia (which here became the decumanus maximus) passed through the gate, which was the city’s main entrance and was therefore richly decorated. It also originally had an inner court, now disappeared.
The gate’s Roman name was Porta Iovia, as it was located near a small temple dedicated to Jupiter lustralis. In the Middle Ages it was called Porta di San Zeno, while the current name derives from the guard soldiers which were paid the dazio (Latin bursarii).
The façade, in local white limestone, has two arches flanked by semi-columns with Corinthian capitals which supports entablature and pediment. In the upper part is a two-floor wall with twelve arched windows, some of which are included in small niches with triangular pediment.
source – wikipedia

Verona Public Building

Verona Public Building

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Discussion

4 thoughts on “Verona, Italy -“thrice blessed”

  1. Gorgeous Italy – Don’t know if you’ve read Peter Ackroyd’s book on Venice – I love his way of taking on history through the eyes of a city. Have just started getting into it.

    Like

    Posted by Chas Spain | January 23, 2013, 10:44 pm

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This work by Dawn Whitehand is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
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